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About Crittenton Women’s Union

2006-2016

After the historic merger of the Women’s Union and Crittenton, Inc., Crittenton Women’s Union (CWU) became Boston’s leading nonprofit innovator in helping low-income women and their families become economically self-sufficient. Its unique approach combined direct service programs, independent research, and public advocacy. Its groundbreaking research and practices was used as a blueprint for local, state, and national non-profits and government institutions serving low-income and homeless individuals and families. On May 6, 2016, Economic Independence Day, CWU announced our future as Economic Mobility Pathways, EMPath for short.

About The Women’s Union

1877-2006

The Women’s Union served as an advocate for economic self-sufficiency for women and their families, providing job-readiness training and mentoring; supportive, transitional housing for battered women; and research and advocacy on behalf of women and their families. Through its ground-breaking research, The Women’s Union created the Self-Sufficiency Standard, which calculates the real costs of living, working and raising a family; identified economically self-sufficient career paths; and highlighted public investments needed to support expanded opportunities for economic self-sufficiency. The Women’s Educational and Industrial Union (WEIU) was founded for the advancement of women in 1877 in Boston, Massachusetts by Harriet Clisby, one of America’s first women physicians.

About Crittenton, Inc.

1824-2006

Crittenton offered a comprehensive array of services related to housing, education, workforce development, and family and life skills support. Each year, thousands of Boston-area residents used these services to find and maintain stable housing; complete their high school education and pursue lifelong learning; develop skills that allow them to compete in the labor market; and become responsible parents, capable of promoting the healthy growth and development of their children.

View the Women’s Educational and Industrial Union Records at the Schlesinger Library